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My Bucket List


  1. Watch a Phoenix Suns home game and shake Dan Majerle's hand.
  2. Spend a year or two in a monastery and there read the Bible over and over.
  3. Travel to Greece alone in old age.
  4. Have the library of my dreams (dark wooden bookcases with those rolling step ladders, high ceilings, trapdoors, busts of thinkers, old maps, a wall for my then large mask collection, two large wooden desks and a Laz-y Boy.)
  5. Become a poet.
  6. Finish my work on Gelassenheit.
  7. Fall madly in love with a complete stranger in a foreign country.
  8. Ask forgiveness from people that I have hurt.
  9. See that my sisters are happy, secure and set for life before I go.
  10. Perform three miracles.


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Comments

  1. cool list! (= is the bucket list an old film or a new one? really have no idea... i like the second, eighth, and the last on your list... by the way, why monastery? you intend to be a monk or simply curious about their way of life? i think you are already number 5. as they say, "at the touch of love, everybody becomes a poet." or was that shakespeare who said that? hehe (=

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  2. hey, yvaughn. It's a new one; saw it already but it's coming out tomorrow in theaters. kept on crying and i knew why.

    neither, actually. but i liken myself to a monk. well, it's really far from it with all my vices, but hey, i like to think of it that way. if i be alone in life, i am going to set up a place which will be a kind of "secular monastery." I've jokingly invited some to join me in the future already. one's a poet and another's a philosopher. something like an epicurean garden with overflowing beer and coffee and books. a butterfly garden will be nice, too.

    haha. i think the second to the last frontier is poetry. and I am miles and miles before i reach that. (and that is why i am applying to teach literature--absurdly, so i can learn it.) but the poet is the philosopher's brother though they are mountains apart. That is why Nietzsche said philosophizing is a kind of shouting from one mountain to another. Well, I'm taking the leap ala Heidegger.

    What's the last frontier? Theology. That is why I wish to become--not a priest nor even a holy monk--but a saint. tsk tsk.

    take care.

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  3. really? i love tearjerker movies! i have to watch that film (= what's the plot of the story, by the way? thanks (=

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  4. two dying guys finally learning how to live. :)

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  5. cool! (= i really have to watch that... is it something like tuesdays with morrie?

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  6. Dr. Feelgood2/09/2008

    So you really believe all that bible stuff, huh?

    ReplyDelete
  7. dr. feelgood,

    tough question--so I would have to pass. but really, it's the best book around; and that i haven't read it through and through is something that i am not quite proud of.

    Like Ecclesiastes or the Book of Job and you might see what i mean. thanks for dropping by!

    ReplyDelete
  8. i just so love the books of poetry in the Bible (= try reading song of songs. you might like it, too, esp. if you're serious about your bucket list (number 5)...

    finally got to watch the bucket list in the silverscreen. i almost missed a good movie (not in SM cinemas anymore, but got to see it in galleria). it's a tearjerker all right. i got inspired to come up with my "updated" bucket list :P

    ReplyDelete

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